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president of the national action be network, reverend al sharp n sharpton. important morning. msnbc and "time" magazine senior analyst mark halperin and thomas roberts back with us. good to have you with us this morning. >> what happened in texas last night? >> it's a fascinating story. we'll begin overnight in texas with the drama that has many americans hearing the name wendy davis for the first time because davis, a democratic state senator there filibustered the sb-5 anti-abortion bill for over 11 hours going late into the night and drawing attention across the country as thousands were watching live online. >> if we were truly talking about women's health care, if we were truly talking about making sure women were safe after an abortion, this is the kind of thing that goes right to the heart of that. and that we could agree. >> the bill would have banned abortions after 20 weeks of
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pregnancy and forced the closure of most abortion clinics in the state. according to texas filibuster rules, davis had to stay on topic, could not lean on anything, and could not take a bathroom break. and she would continue to speak until just under the 11-hour mark when republican lieutenant governor david dewhurst ruled davis violated the senate's three-strike rule, a decision not well received by supporters outside the senate chamber. let her speak, let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. >> according to dewhurst, strike one was davis' mention of planned parenthood which republicans said was off topic. strike two came when a colleague offered davis a back brace seven hours into the filibuster, violating the lean policy. can you believe this?
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and the final strike came when davis mentioned the state's 2011 sonogram law, again off topic. really? davis' filibuster fell short of the midnight vote deadline but her fellow democrats appealed the decision causing chaos in the chamber. >> at what point must a female senator raise her hand on her voice to be recognized over the male colleagues in the room? >> for the next 15 minutes, supporters of davis drowned out any further senate debate. republicans tried to pass the bill before midnight. midnight deadline, but failed. and in front of a packed capitol building of supporters, the announcement by the lieutenant governor that the bill was dead was read allowed. the bill would have banned abortions after 2 weeks of pregnancy and forced the closure of most abortion clinics in the state. >> so mark halperin, this is where the abortion debate goes now. the supreme court is giving states more latitude to make these sort of decisions. we're talking about here we're
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talking about 20 weeks. and i think we're going to be seeing this a lot more in the coming years. >> not just the 20 weeks but there's other restrictions that some say would deny access to abortion rights to a lot of women in texas. this is round one. rick perry though i think is probably likely to call another special session and try to bring this up again. as much as the eyes of the nation were on texas in this fight last night, they're really going to be on it if there's a second round here. you're going to see celebrity, activists on both sides all over the country, on twitterer from else in the next round. it's going to be quite a fight. >> one of the provisions had to do with regulations and those supporting the bill would say to make abortion clinics safer. >> uh-huh. >> and, of course, there are a lot of people after the horrors of philadelphia saying that tom ridge, a republican, was who then governor actually dropped
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regulations to such a degree to win political support that he will allowed dangerous environment to fester. so there's going to be a back and forth in this fight. it's going to go national. >> we'll follow this remarkable events overnight. obviously we're going to have ray bigger conversation about the vote are rights acstory in this block. quickly while we're on politics, anthony weiner's candidacy for mayor of new york city was looked upon by skepticism by many. a lot of disgust. >> just like you were skeptical about barack obama in 2007. >> i was not skeptical. >> who was that? mark halperin. >> i was not skeptical about obama or anthony weiner, believe it or not. >> really? >> yeah. i told you all his wife would help him out a great deal because she's an amazing woman. but after trailing by a wide gap for weeks, a new poll shows him in the lead. an nbc 4 new york "wall street journal" poll shows the former congressman taking a lead over front-runner christine quinn.
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49% of voters say they would consider voting for him up before he entered the race. he leads among men and even women. and for those who said they would consider voting him, he's up by nine points since before he entered the race. those who said they wouldn't consider vote are for him dropped to 45%. >> new york city politics stranger. >> very strange. but stranger things have happened. >> can he win? >> he can win. whether he will win, i have no idea. he's come up to our headquarters and spoke. he was well received. but i still think it's anyone's race to call. it's not going to be decided until very late. >> lucky enough to be with christine quinn last night at an event in the city and she seemed upbeat and agreed to come today at 11:00 a.m. >> he works around the clock. what's wrong with him? >> he doesn't sleep. >> you need to take a break. >> invite this man to a dipper
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party. assume he'll try to book. >> you when he's not watching documentaries. >> i've been known to do that. >> so why is quinn, mark halperin, not -- she seems to be facing resistance. why, in the city? >> i think she's not found her voice and a message and lost control of her public image. she's had a lot of negative press coverage. she's been a weak front-runner all along. i still she can win. right now she has to change the dynamics of the race to make the runoff. >> mayor bloomberg, is he helpful, hurtful? >> the only candidate who has a better chance than anthony weiner is bill thompson. mayor bloomberg has turned his guns on bill thompson. >> which may help because you are talking about a democratic primary and a democratic primary, i would want bloomberg against me because the third
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term is still something he changed the law and a lot of democrats including me did not agree with that. stop and frisk and other things. in a general bloomberg may be helpful. in a democratic primary, this could help thompson. >> oddly enough in the are upoff, you know, hypothetical runoff, christine quinn qun leads anthony weiner by about 2%. there's 14% that remains undecided. you've got to imagine they are setting their sights on the undecided. >> i guess the who shock is anthony weiner has so quickly come back. you know what will he? headline writers at the "new york post" celebrating am i reading what they say about anthony weiner being top banana? scenario of no, i haven't even shown that. >> angry. i'll use the word angry because. >> what. >> i'll tell you what. >> what? >> first of all, there are men in politics who have done far
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worse. >> here we go. >> far worse, far, far far, far worse. >> today, the nation's highest court. >> it's more sad and very embarrassing. leave him alone. today the nation's highest court will deliver its rulings on the last three cases. >> following on twitter. >> i've seen other unbelievable stories. okay. this session. two of which decide marriage rights for gays and lesbians in the united states. yesterday, the supreme court struck down a key part of the most important civil rights law ever passed in america. the voting rights act of 1965. nbc's pete williams has that story. >> the ruling deals a crippling and potentially fatal blow to the law signed by president johnson in 1965, a response to widespread efforts in the south to prevent blacks from voting. >> we're marching today to dramatize to the nation. >> veteran john lewis, now a georgia congressman, watched as the law was signed. >> without the voting rights act
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of 1965, there would be no barack obama as president of the united states of america. we've come too far, made too much progress to go back. >> this decision represents a serious setback for voting rights. and has the potential to negatively affect millions of americans across the country. >> in a 5-4 ruling the court's conservatives said the areas covered by the voting rights act have changed but the law has not kept up. the act requires states with a history of voter discrimination to get permission from the federal government before changing how they conduct elections. the court left that part intact. but it struck down the map, the coverage formula of where that requirement applies. that's all of nine mostly southern states and parts of six others. chief justice kru john roberts said the map is based on decades-old data and eradicated practices. in five of the covered southern states, he said, african-americans have a higher voter turnout percentage than whites. opponents of the law who helped shelby county, alabama challenge
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it hailed the ruling >> we've just elected a black president of the shelby county board of education over a white incumbent in a county wide election. >> african-americans are an integral part of southern political life and that's a good thing and that's never going to change. >> but writing for the court's four dissenters justice ruth bader ginsburg said gutting the law that helped it end voter discrimination is like throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet. >> interesting. pete williams reporting. reverend al? >> i'm confused. i'm genuinely confused here. the law stays in place. they take out the part though that targets these states that extraordinarily offensive diskrimnarily practices back in -- poll taxes and literacy tests and with to do anything to keep minorities from voting. and they succeeded.
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why roberts asks all these years later do we keep what is section 4b that targets the states who actually now have moral african-americans going out percentage wise than white voters? >> well, first of all, the fact that you have more going out does not go with his ruling. you have more going out because they're protected to go out. you don't remove the remedy and then say the patient or the healer himself or herself, what they've done in this ruling which is devastating to voting rights in my opinion, is they've said, oh, voting rights is fine. section 5 is fine. the preclearance by the justice department. but we're going to take the pap away. and what that is equivalent, to, joe, is saying yes, the patient is sick. medicine is helping the patient. but it's not healing the patient totally. so let's take the medicine away
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that is in place until we can find the medicine that's going to heal him totally, which means you end up with no medicine. >> no, it means you treat all 50 states the same because it's not. >> why are you going to take the medicine out now? why would you remove the map until you get a better map? what you're saying is these states that last year, not '65, last year, a federal court in texas said that the voter i.d. laws that texas was changing was discriminatory. last year you had texas, florida, south carolina that the remedy was work. last year. we're not talking about '65. why would you now have it open where texas yesterday came in with voter i.d. so they can discriminate now while you figure out something else out. >> seconds 2 still allows the court to continue to apply -- the '65 voting rights act is still intact. >> yes. >> all the court said yesterday was we're not going to presume
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that arizona is moraysist than new york. >> no, what it said yesterday, joe, you can't have free clearance. what it means you can go in the justice department and sue or try to spend a lot of money and get an injunction. but you no longer have to have clearance. none of these states have to come to you to change things which handicaps our voting rights. >> you think in arizona, in alabama, in georgia, if they want to move a voting polling place from a middle school in a neighborhood to an elementary school in a neighborhood, that the federal government has a right in 2013, in 2013, to presume that they're bigots and they have to clear it first with the justice department? >> no, i presume that in 2013, based on 2012, the last election -- that in texas and in south carolina and others that
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they may come up with schemes that would disproportionately impact the voting of minorities because the perl court in texas said it last year. so we don't have to argue about it. this is a fact. >> i'm not arguing. i'm talking about numbers here and the numbers are overwhelming. african-american participation has exploded across america. >> because we were protected. >> including. >> yes. >> now that protection is gone. >> let me talk. will you please let me say a sentence or two here. i'm giving you fakes and numbers, okay? i'm not getting mad. i'm i'm the one that's keeping my voice down. al and i are friends. we're just talking through this. i think you look, and i heard all last year about voter suppression. i heard it in all 350 states and everybody was trying -- it was a higher turnout for african-americans than ever before in the history of the united states. and let's look at mississippi
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for instance. again, i'm just talking about numbers here. in mississippi back in 1965, 6.7% of the african-american population voted in 1965. in 2004, 76.1% of the african-americans, from 6 to 76%. last year, over 80% of african-americans in mississippi voted. more than white voters percentage wise in mississippi. and i guess you and i see this differently. i believe the voting rights act feeds to stay in place forever. but this one section that says these states are racist and have to be looked at and that history ended in 1965, to me and perhaps it's because i've lived in the southeast and i've lived in the northeast and i've heard people
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talking behind closed doors in the southeast and the northeast and in a lot of ways, the southeast has been through the fire. and we actually have a more open view on race than a lot of places i've lived in in the northeast. perhaps i don't think we should treat these states and arizona based on how they were in 1965 any more than we should judge germany based on how it was in 1945. >> let me respond. one, i agree with you that there are more than those states but do you not therefore say that we're going to let those states go, not have to preclear, even though there is recent history. last year, joe, not '65, 2012, that courts found discrimination. we're going to let that go. they can change whatever they want. yesterday, texas went instituted voter i.d. yesterday rit after this decision came which a court last year said was discriminatory.
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i'm saying why didn't you keep all that in place until you came with your new formula. >> you're talking about somebody bringing a picture i.d. we they go vote. >> i'm talking about picture i.d. i'm talking about changing early voting, ending sunday before primary day. that a federal court found discriminatory, not al sharpton. >> and are we comparing making somebody bring a photo i.d. to a photo booth and ending early voting in some areas, is that akin to a poll tax or to the blatant outrageous diskrimary practices of -- you and i can have a debate on voter i.d. i don't think it's racist. there have been studies that show it affects white voters as much as it affects black voters. >> there are studies on both sides but a court found it to be discriminatory. you can't put a new paint job on an old car and act like we have a new car. >> i'm not going to even follow
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you into that analogy because i'm not sure what it means. but i will say this. changing the rules on the margins on early voting and making somebody bring a picture i.d. to the voting booth, far different from literacy tests, poll taxes, taking a baseball bat to the side of people's heads. i mean, the world has changed. i've got to say that while supporting the civil rights act, section 4 b, i actually look at it as a positive thing that these states have changed so much over the past 50 years. that we have moved beyond the racism of 1965. >> i think the problem for the court's decision is that it really does now require congress to fine tune how the civil rights act is going to work in the current world. and congress is in no position because the polarization to do
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it. i want to ask you, do you want in perpetuity for these states to be treated unequal. >> no, i have no problem with a new map as long as you kept what was there in place to protect people while you went through trying to find a new map because what you just said is the problem. this congress is not inclined to come with a new map. so what you've really done is you've killed precleerps and that is something that is terrible. >> i think the strongest part of joe's argument is you've got some states who are currently treated under law before this decision differently. the presumption is that those states have a bigger problem handling these issues than states we au saw in the last election cycle in the northeast which tried to pass laws which were also a fight. isn't it time, isn't there an argument at least there's a time for these southern states and arizona to not be treated like they've got some long-standing problem. >> then the congress ought to come with a new map. you don't let that go when some
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of these very states were found in court to be discriminatory. last year, we keep talking about '65 like we didn't have this argument last year. >> there were other states, as well. >> those states ought to be included. you can't just open the door and say i'll tell you what, because he may be guilty too, we're going to let you go. that's crazy. >> those states you can still if there's a problem in one of these states, there are still remedies ta people have. >> by and by when the morning comes, when we get a congress that will do it, not now because now those states are wide open as texas did yesterday. they didn't even wait. yesterday. >> reverend, didn't they reauthorize this in '06? from '06 to 2013, have we moved far enough as a country to get where we are with the supreme court and what they issued? because in '09 the onus was on congress to get this done and they did not do it. chuck todd said yesterday on air that he didn't think there was the maturity necessary in congress to take this on and get
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it done. from '06 to 2013, have we come far enough to be where we are now? >> i think the answer is obviously no. i think the real problem is, i don't think anyone around this table or any other table believes this congress will come with that map. so we're right back to where we started having to fight for preclearance because they've now opened the door to things that we had to fight last year in courts. >> does anybody around this table though think that these states are run by racist and bigots in 2013? because let's just be really blunt about this. let's strip this down. when i was reading the headlines yesterday and i heard the president talking about these states having a history of discrimination, i said damn right they did. i grew up in them. so i know. but in 2013, let's be very clear. if you're outraged by this decision that section 4 b takes
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the map away as you say, you are not suggesting that racists and bigots still run government in arizona, in alabama, georgia, louisiana, mississippi, south kirnl, and virginia? >> no, what i'm saying is that racial inequality as far as voting still occurs in those states which some of what i c cited, some of which the federal courts. those states have agreed are discriminatory. the effect is a racial imbalance. you don't have to be a bigot, i don't have 0 prove one is a racist if the results are that there is unequal protection of voting rights under the law, then you should have the justice department still there to preclear. >> here's the problem with that argument. in five of the six states, the voting percentages of african-americans are higher than the voting percentages of white participation. so. >> that's right. >> there is not that evidence of unequal treatment. >> of course, it is.
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the evidence is the reason that it was higher is because there were preclearance laws protecting those voters. you now have removed what made that possible. >> what would you -- >> you capital say i gave you medicine to make you feel better. therefore, see you didn't need the medicine. >> what are you waiting for to say these states should be treated like all the others. >> the congress should have done exactly what he said. do i anew map but keep that map in place till you do a new map. you don't remove all maps and say now let's go back one day and do a new map. why would you remove a map that was needed last year? three states eric holder the attorney general had to stop three states last year. you're going to remove a map now and say we'll get to a new map one day but right now you can do what you want. that is outrageous. >> we're going to continue this conversation after a break. also the dissenting justices were very upset and did some things that were apparently unconventional in terms of their
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response. >> talking with joe. >> no -- there are those that agree. it's a fascinating conversation. reverend, thank you for coming in early. stay with us if you can. coming up on "morning joe" congressman keith ellis son wil be here. also robert gibbs, tina brown and later natalie cole, daughter of the late nat king of cole joins us here with her new album. up next, the top stories in the political playbook. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. we're at the legendary southfork ranch in dallas for a cookout with world champion grill master brett galloway. he's serving his guests walmart choice premium steaks. but they don't know it yet. they will. it's a steak-over. steak was excellent. very tender. melts in your mouth. it was delicious. tonight you are eating walmart steak. what???!! good steak. two thumbs up? look, i ate all of mine. it matches any good steakhouse if not better. walmart choice premium steak
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what's in your wallet? [ crows ] now where's the snooze button?
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it is 27 past the hour. time now to take a look at the morning papers. we'll start with our parade of papers. "the washington post," the united states army has announced plans to cut 12 combat brigades and reduce 80,000 active duty troops because of the end to the iraq and afghanistan wars. the army is seeking to make drastic cuts to their budget because of the sequestration.
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changes will roll out over the next five years and is the largest organizational change to the u.s. army since the end of world war ii. >> and the dallas morningnous, consumer spending hit a three-month high in may led by growing demand for cars. economists point to an improving housing market as a key factor for the rise in consumer confidence. that's great news. >> are they buying trucks, f-150s? >> the fda has exercised its power to regulate cigarette sales for first time on tuesday. yesterday, the agency approved two new tobacco products and passed on four others. the fda cannot state why a product has declined but reasons vary from nicotine levels that are too high to public health concerns. >> from the rio times, demonstrations continue in brazil after proposed changes by the president refail to satisfy the protesters outraged over poor public service programs and spending related to hosting the
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world cup next summer and the olympic games in 2016. citizens are planning daily protests as they continue to organize and voice their concerns. this, of course, leading to more concerns over the world cup being in brazil in 2014. many people inside the soccer world just don't think it's going to be ready and that it's going to be chaos and pandemonium. >> and causing social strife, as well. korea times major government websites in south korea were offline yesterday after being hacked. including the official presidential site. the incident comes amid the 63rd anniversary of the korean war. south korean officials are still investigating the source of these cyber attacks. >> and the "usa today," the fbi's investigating the theft of $1.2 million off a flight that landed at kennedy airport from switzerland. the missing cash was discovered during processing at the federal reserve are when the count came up short.
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officials are trying to determine whether the money disappeared before it left zurich or after it landed. >> "wall street journal," barnes and noble is planning to stop production of the nook. the color screen tablets says sales of the ereader have fallen 35%. this is a struggling book industry that now turned into the nook and didn't work. the market proved to be too tough for barnes & noble forcing the company to invest too much money to keep up with the ipad and the kindle. overall retail sales for the company have declined by 10%. >> of course, you wanted to know what was up. >> i didn't actually. >> with singer brown. escharged in l.a. last night with hit and run and driving without a license after rear ending another car in may. if convicted he could face up to four years in jail for violating his probation stemming from his domestic violence dispute with rihanna. >> that's a singer. let's go to politico. joining us now with the political playbook, jim
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vandehei. a landmark speech for president obama yesterday on climate change but you say house republicans may have little recourse in stopping his plans. >> think about what will an amazing weak we're in we don't even get to the climate change the big speech the president's been planning for weeks because you have this fight over the voting rights act, you have the showdown in texas, you have gay marriage rulings before the court. this speech was a big deal for the white house. it basically says listen,'s nothing we can do with are this congress to get our agenda through. we're going to use the executive authority reinterpreting the clean air act to start to regulate emissions in a way that could cripple the coal industry and could help the president achieve his aim of trying to reduce those greenhouse emissions. house republicans admit there's nothing they can do to stop it because it's an interpretation of the clean air act using executive authority and not
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asking congress really for anything. so unlike immigration, unlike the budget fights, this one is one that the president can control. >> steering wheel did the president say about keystone yesterday? >> that was interesting because no reporters thought he was going to talk about the ski stone pipeline. what he said was, listen i'm not going to approve the keystone pipeline unless it's clear it's not going to have adverse environmental effects. there's different ways to interpret it. most people are interpreting it if you look at what the state department and others have said on that score score, they said it will not increase green haas gas emissions. a lot of people read it he would approve the keystone pipeline, which would be a huge deal particularly to the environmentalists who were thrilled yesterday would be not so thrilled by that announcement. >> we appreciate it. >> coming up next, yankees gm brian cashman tells alex rodriguez. >> you can't say what he said. >> to shut the blank up.
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after a-rod posted comments on twitter. happy days, happy days straight ahead. the dailily news says it best. we'll be right back with more "morning joe." she promised them... a tropical paradise. but the mutiny is already in full swing. just wait till they tell everyone back home... how she totally booking nailed it! now the only issue is: who gets that? planet earth's number one accomodation site: booking.com booking.yeah! i hate getting up in the morning. i love cheese. i love bread. i'm human! and the weight watchers 360 program lets me be.
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36 past the hour. if you thought the irs's problems ended with targeting political groups, thing again. congressman darrell issa is now saying they awarded inappropriate contracts to a virginia computer company worth hundreds of millions of dollars. the investigation found the contracts were secured through an inappropriate relationship between the company's president and an irs contracting official. now, the inspector general says poor oversight allowed workers to use agency credit cards to bile alcohol, romance novels, diet pills, and online porn. >> well, irs, having some problems. >> we turn to the special election in massachusetts now where last night voters elected congressman ed markey to fill the senate seat left by secretary of state john kerry. >> thanks to the opportunities this country gave me, this son of a milkman is going to serve
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the state of massachusetts in the united states senate. i pledge that i will be a senator who fight for you every hour on every vote on every issue to make progress for you and for your families. >> markey who has served as a congressman in massachusetts since 1976 easily beat republican newcomer gabriel gomez, 55-45. >> al a lot of republicans were hoping that you would have a return of scott brown style upset. >> right. >> coming off chris christie upset in 2009, you then had scott brown winning in 2010. this might be an indication that thing aren't as favorable for the republicans going into the off year elections. >> no, this was one they really needed if they were going to cement this christie, scott brown kind of thing. it didn't happen. i think that it's a good sign
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for democrats but they shouldn't get too far celebratory yet. >> it is tumultuous out there. anybody that says the they know what's going to happen next year is just lying. it is so tumultuous, it's a pox on both their houses. >> do you like the asterisk pound size and percentage or the dash dash? which in terms of style. >> i like the dailinous style. >> that one? >> so what's happening? a-rod back in the news. >> yankees gm brian cashman, that's basically what he said in response to injured third baseman alex rodriguez tweeting, visit from dr. kelly over the weekend who gave me the best news. the green light to play games again. cashman told espn new york "when the yankees want to announce something, we will. alex should just shut the [ bleep ] up. that's it. i'm going to call alex now."
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a-rod hasn't play this had season dealing with a hip surgery, cashman says he has no idea when he'll be ready fur game action. a-rod turns 38. >> these guys make a lot of money talk this way. >> action on the field, the yankees hosting the rakers. facing kuroda. darvish leading the league in strikeouts. bottom of the ninth. another japanese import ichiro, two outs. that would be a walk-off win. rangers snap the rangers five-game winning streak. to boston, pedro dishing out some ice cream. he was all over boston playing ice cream man. a treat at the ballpark. good day for boston. red sox fans, 20 hits. pedroia knocked in four. they trounced the rockies 11-4. how about the mets in chicago finding new and enticing ways to raise your hopes and then lose.
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top of the ninth, new york down one down to their final out. daniel murphy pops it up. easy play. whoop. gordon beckham drops it. the game is tied. but fear not, downtrodden fans. here comes bottom of the ninth, two outs, two on. alexei ramirez. how about this one -- chicago wins it in walkoff fashion. the mets lose. so it wasn't even good luck. mika, how about this one? >> let me see. >> since you liked the giraffe getting its head taken off. >> why would you think. >> 120-mile-an-hour be at wimbledon. that's going to leave a mark. that was from mardy fish. >> why. >> i don't know if a human reaction time, the be was out. she got the call correct. >> can we make it even slower? >> ouch. >> okay, come on now. >> still ahead on "morning joe," a t-shirt and jeans is apparently all you ped to complete a high wire act across
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the grand canyon. crazy jesus lord, help this cable to calm down. command it in your name, jesus. it's the authority of god. praise you. >> i'm going to say the same thing about this set sometimes. >> daredevil nik wallenda is going to be here live on set and a war of words between serena williams and maria sharapova. could the two settle their difference on the court? we're going to have that straight ahead. first, mika's must read opinion pages. you're watching morning are joe" brewed by starbucks. out there owning it.
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and water back to future generations. people should make up their own mind what's best for them. all i can say is it has worked well for us. welcome back to "morning joe." 45 past the hour. a live look at capitol hill on this beautiful day in washington and new york. mike barnicle's here. hi, mike. >> good morning, mika. >> all right. national journal michael hirsch, we haven't gotten to the snowden story yet today. why putin is loving it. whatever putin may be saying now about not wanting to harm the business-like character of our
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relations with the u.s., it is evident that russia's foreign policy is largely shaped by its leader's desire to meddle with america and its power around the world. he has hilt business entire rise to power on the idea of resurrecting the prestige and geopolitical impact of his former employer. some russia experts say the truth is even simple plefr than that. putin is essentially still the street tough he was when he was raised in the poor section of st. petersburg. his world view has been mostly shaped by that upbringing and his career in the kgb when his job was to oppose u.s. power and influence. >> everybody that knows putin says he is driven by resentment of the united states. this snowden situation is absolutely a dream come true for him. >> sure, it's back to the future for putin. he's a guy whose entire life is
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shaped in the '60s and the '70s. the ussr as mika just pointed out reading that piece. this is perfect for him because he can stick a thumb constantly in the eyes of the united states, not just with regard to this specific issue but with economic issues, as well. that's who he is. >> the one thing that putin has gone on record saying, it's like sheering a biglet. there's a lot of sweel squealing and very little wool. who knows if there's still a lot of resentment from 2010 this summer of anna chapman. >> could be. al, i want to read for you "the wall street journal." voting rights progress. this is the main editorial in the journal. the u.s. has a long and difficult history with racial discrimination but on tuesday the supreme court reporter court marked a milestone worth celebrating when it ruled a section of the '65 voting rights acoutlived its usefulness. justices determined the law's section covering formula which requires nine states and parts of seven others to get preclearance can no longer be
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constitutionally justified, our country has changed and while any racial discrimination in voting is too much roberts wrote, congress must ensure that legislation that passes to remedy the problem speaks to current conditions. what's your response? >> my response is that what are the current conditions? we just came out of an election where it was clearly established we still have racial disparities in terms of the protection of the vote. so in order to deal with. >> racially based? >> racially based? >> yes. >> that's why i keep citing the court in texas. this is federal court. >> right. >> so when you have this documented, not by studies but by courts in 2012, you don't therefore remove everything and say', let's go to something new. you keep what's in place that has protected people and then you expand it if you need to. they didn't do that. they eliminated preclearance, period. and then say now tell us a new
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map if you can come together and no one believes that can happen right away. >> the "wall street journal" also calls the reaction to tuesday's ruling over the top. especially among democrats who exhumed their roll the clock back metaphors. they still can't let go of the politics of racial polarization that gets them elected. if democrats were spectacular the, they would realize that is racial gerry mandering helps house republicans may making so many fewer districts competitive and say president obama was especially disappointing showing himself once again to be a divider, not a uniter declaring in a rare public comment on the high court that the decision upsets decades of well established practices to keep voting fair in areas where discrimination has been historically prevalent. so the country country that has twice elected an african-american to the highest political office must be forever
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locked into a madmen time warp. >> again, the country that elected a black president twice did it under section 5 of the voting rights act. what they refuse to give recognition to -- >> section 5 remains. >> section 5 remains. >> section 5 was attacked with no map which means it's not intact. >> section 5 though still allows the federal government, mike, to enforce the law. the voting rights act. it's just you're not saying that these nine states that are targeted because they were run by bigots in 1965 are still run by bigots in 2013. >> the section 5 element is like saying section 5 is the nail. section 4 was the hammer. we're going to take the hammer away from you. so good luck getting the nail in. >> in 1965. >> that's the point. >> na whwhat about south boston? >> look what happened in 1976 in south boston? >> let's take south boston.
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>> hold on a second. we've got people from massachusetts lecturing us in the south? and you look at the scenes in south boston? i'm just saying, yes, the south was run by bigots in 1965. in 2013, i just wonder whether we should still be judged by 1965 standards. >> you ought not to be judged by those standards of 1965. 50 years ago this summer we had the march on washington. it's rather ironic you have this ruling now. 50 years ago, the world, the south all nine states and more were vastly different than they are today. here's what's going to happen. we take a look at national elections. presidential elections. with the full force of the federal law. no discrimination. we're taking a look at you. county commission ker elections, state legislature elections, those elections will continue and maybe republican legislatures in some states might try to tichker with them at their peril. if they do, they will not be
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able to defeat the tide of demographics in the south. hispanic and african-american votes are going to be overwhelmingly majority in most states. >> reverend, i understand where you're coming from. but i think it is a bit over the top. the outrage over this. >> the reason that it's not over the top is because you have removed preclearance. there is no way to stop it. and if we didn't have preclearance last year, three states would have proceeded. so we're not talking ancient history. we're talking about the very last election. >> just a reminder, you can read our must reads on our blog m jo.msnbc.com. still ahead, would you consider yourself a digital addict? >> could you go without your smartphone for a full month? >> i would love to. >> that's what one writer did and it wasn't pretty. next, news you can't use. straight ahead. >> he's on it. "i'm part of an american success story,"
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yesterday was a little rough. >> it was rough. you know what i suggest? i suggest, thomas. >> i was board. >> you lead with something strong like. >> bored with the chest hair coat? >> that was good. i blocked that out of my mind. sorry. that was pretty good. >> you ended well. >> exactly. >> so do you have any stories about gorillas? >> i do actually.
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>> go ahead. >> it's almost right out of a passage for kids at the zoo. you can't help but taunt the animals. that's exactly what was happening at the dallas zoo's western lowland gorilla exhibit. one of those apes weren't taking it anymore. take a listen. >> why are they doing that? >> i wouldn't let them do that. >> look at the gorilla. it's just great. >> you know what? >> exactly what he's doing. >> i'm going to try that. >> i wanted to show you the streaker at the dole shea and gabbana fashion show. >> tell us about that. >> i don't have the picture. >> why not? >> i sent it this morning. >> was it rejected? >> there was a streaker that ran in the fashion show. >> like on runway. >> on the runway, nude. >> nothing is x rated on the show. >> all right. >> why didn't you -- who rejected it? >> the powers that be. >> excuse me? >> there are no powers.
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so it's and arc can i. send it up to the highest court if the land. >> streaker. >> they struck down seconds 4 b of the streaker. >> struck down my streaker at the dole shea and gabbana. >> thank you so much. a big show at 11:00. >> christine quinn. we'll have reaction to the supreme court rulings with doma and prop 8 coming out today. rev, your gut. >> i think the court will probably go down the middle on this. >> i think doe ma goes away, prop 8 gets kicked back to california. i like the fact i'm married in new york and should be able to travel to any state in this land and still be married. >> you better hope they don't take away your map. >> if what they did with the states and said all the states are equal, i should be married in each one of them. >> equally unequal. >> thomas, thank you so much. >> reverend, thank you. great talking to you. we'll see you at 6:00 tonight on "politics nation."
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coming up next, robert gibbs and also pete williams for the latest on the supreme court's whirlwind week of decision pchz what happened yesterday and what we can expect yet today. more "morning joe" straight ahead. i moved here from russia and i gained weight
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have the security you need to get you there. call us. we can show you how at&t solutions can help you do what you do... even better. ♪ thankfully, chief justice john roberts, old blue eyes, knows that the south doesn't need to be babysat anymore. it's just like those outdated labor laws that prohibit children from threading bobbins in a loom. a kid hasn't been sucked into one of those machines in years. >> welcome back to "morning joe." "mike barnicle and mark halperin are still with us. joining us the table, editor of the daily beast tina brown and from washington, msnbc
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contributor robert gibbs. good group this hour. >> it's a great group. >> uh-huh. are we in a good mood? >> i'm almost in a good mood. i'll tell you what, i would love to throw away my iphone for a month. >> we have a segment coming up with someone who did that. i don't know what i would do and i don't know what our kids would do. that's really bad. >> i've gotten worse and worse and worse about carrying them around. people e-mail me and think i'm being rude. and then i'll call them and mom, i just -- i don't -- i just -- i just am so exhausted by it. >> we get so many e-mails. >> we wake up at 4:00. you wake up earlier. going till 10:00 or 11:00 at night, just human interactions let alone all the e-mails and everything else coming in. >> you drown. you just want to be free. you say please set me free. the truth is, you leave it and you're even more drowned.
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>> no, it's the perfect vehicle to prevent you from drowning. i'll tell you why. if you're walking down the street and say, phil griffin is coming the other way, okay, take your phone even though no one's talking to you, you start -- all you have to do is wave and not talk to people you don't want to talk to. >> i'm finding myself more and more waking up on saturday morning like at 5:30 in the morning and answering e-mails. >> it's that hideous -- you reach for your iphone at 4:00 in the morning and can't go back to sleep. >> i believe the impact on the brain is -- >> the impact on the brain tweeting all the time, it impairs your judgment. you start doing terrible things. and then you get put in a position where you can never run for office again. >> no, you don't need to. >> how's that for a segue? anthony weiner's cappedcy was looked upon by mika.
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>> after trailing for weeks, a new poll shows anthony wiener the lead. >> my goodness. >> an nbc 4 new york/"wall street journal" poll shows the former congressman taking a five-point lead over front runner christine quinn. now 49% of voters said they'd consider voting for him up from 40% two months ago before he entered the race. weaner leads among men and even women. tina, are you surprised? >> we just ended the post embarrassment age. there is nothing that is embarrassing at all and nothing that you really can't get beyond. i'm beginning to think that you really do need some kind of a sex scandal, some kind of an issue in order to get elected. because what it actually does, it increases your q rating and pain stream tv presence. everybody's got something to ask you. i think being caught in a sex can scandal of any kind is actually a really big asset for
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today's modern. >> mark, would you agree? >> i disagree. i think he's doing well because it's an extraordinarily weak field. if he didn't have the field, he would be dominating the race even more. he's well funded, articulate. thought about what he wants to do for the city. he's got real policy. >> just a week ago i heard the guy was on edge, acting bizarre on the campaign trail. somebody -- he's having a quote breakdown. he wasn't having a breakdown but he was acting erratic on the campaign trail a week ago. >> he's all -- >> how weak the field is. >> he always had a bit of that. >> he is smart, well fundeden aggressive. he actually is a decent sort of strong candidate. it's remarkable though that he can get beyond what happened. >> what do new yorkers want this their mayor based on last five elections? >> a larger than live, someone who can represent new york to the world. and again, anthony is a flawed candidate in a variety of way, including his personal history. but if you look at the rest of the field, it is no surprise
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mika's not surprised, i'm not surprised that a guy with his skills in this field could be in the top of the polls. mike? >> it would seem to me, just anecdotally you pick this up looking at it from an outsider's point of view here in new york city, anthony weiner symbolizes new york much more so than anyone else in that field. is he going to yell at the cab driver. he's going to get out of the cab. you know, he's the kind of guy not going to stand for what you're doing to him. he's going to be in your face, push things around to get things done. the key word is lead. he's going to lead. >> robert gibbs, what do you think? >> boy, there's a thousand jokes you want to make. even though it's cable tv, i won't. i do think it's remarkably stunning. i will say it will probably does speak to the fact that whenever you run a race as a frontrunner and run it as if you're going to win, you just have to run out the clock, you tend to find yourself in a much more competitive race than you thought you would. i think anthony weiner at least
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has gone out there and run an aggressive campaign as if he was and he was at that point behind. i think you've seen the front-runner in this race run a front runner's race and what happens in those races is they generally aren't very well run political campaigns. >> robert, you are -- let's turn to this decision yesterday from the supreme court. you're a southern guy like me from alabama. what year were you born? >> 1971. >> '71. you're a young guy. >> yeah. >> so integration by the time you were starting school integration had already kicked in. but i was just talking to al last hour about how much has changed over the past 50 years. and i actually see the fact that the map is not as relevant as it was 50 years ago as a great advancement but others are very
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concerned. what's your take as a democrat and a son of the south on the court's decision yesterday on the civil rights act? >> i think this could be one of the most profound decisions we've seen from the court in a long time. i don't think anybody would doubt or argue with you, joe, that in the broader sense, you have seen quite a bit of change in the south since the mid-1960s. but look, you know, we're dealing with paula deen in the news this week as if it were somewhere in the 1960s. right? >> so as some things on the surface change, others do not. i do think you've already seen an impact on this decision. texas and north carolina moving forward with voter i.d. laws. alabama that had passed one but hadn't moved it really because they were waiting for this decision. again, i think there will be a profound impact on this and i think there's a double-edged sword obviously for the republican party in this. they control the state legislatures in all of the
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states that were -- that had to do preclearance but they've got to be careful that they don't overreach in trying to curtail the sort of early voting time periods or voter i.d. because as their coalition got wider in 2012, the electorate got less white, more diverse. their coalition got less diverse. they've got to be careful here. >> the ruling was 5-4. joining us now from the supreme court nbc news justice correspondent pete williams. pete? >> good morning. >> go ahead. >> okay. well, yes, and the court's conservatives really sent a warning four years ago they were going to do this. so this decision should come as no surprise. four years ago, they had the same challenge to the law. they came right up to the edge, look over and said we're not ready to strike down the voting rights act yet. but attention congress, we think that the formula you're using to cover which states have to get preclearance is out of date. unless you change it, it's
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constitutionally suspect and they followed through on it yesterday. so that's exactly what they said they were going to do. here was their constitutional analysis. they say that the voting rights act turns the normal relationship between the federal government and the says the upside down. the constitution gives the states the authority to conduct elections. the voting rights act said, any change to the covered states want to make is suspect from the beginning and the federal government has to look and make sure it's not designed to suppress the minority vote. they said that was okay. that would pass constitutional muster when discrimination was so bad and so obvious ta it justified that kind of strong medicine. but now the court said there's too much of a mitts match and cited sticks showing in five of the six states in the south, the original covered states, there's more black voter turnout than there is white voter turnout as a percentage of the vote. they said congress, update this map. you didn't do it and until you do, this law is dead in the water. >> big decisions coming down
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today. tell us about them. >> very big. the last two -- actually the last three, the third one is one you'll never hear about again, but these retwo blockbuster cases on same-sex marriage. first the test of proposition 8 in california. you may recall same-sex marriage started there in 2008 and then it was stopped a few months later when voters went to the polls and passed a state constitutional amendment to ban same sex marriage. 'been challenged in court and the supreme court will decide what's to become of that. the second is a challenge to a federal law passed in 199 6 by congress signed by clinton called the defense of marriage act. it says as far as the federal government is concerned, marriage can exist only between one man and one woman. the court will decide whether that's constitutional. the effect of that law is to block the federal government from recognizing the validity of same sex marriages in the states where they're legal and states number now 12 and the district of columbia here. so the court is deciding those two issues.
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it's not going to decide the question of whether the all states have to allow same-sex marriage. it's really inconceivable whatever the court does today is it going to change that. >> all right. nbc's pete williams. thank you very much. >> everything that you, pete. >> we're going to turn now to a remarkable story out of texas especially if you love politics. the name wendy davis, she's a democratic state senator there, may become nationally known today. she filibustered an anti-abortion bill for over 11 hours going late into the night and drawing attention across the country as thousands were watching live online. >> if we were truly talking about women's health care, if we were truly talking about making sure women were safe after an abortion, this is the kind of thing that goes right to the heart of that. and that we could agree. the bill would have banned abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy and force the closure of most abortion clinics in the
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state. according to texas filibuster rules, davis had to stay on topic, could not lean on anything, and could not take a bathroom break. and she would continue to speak until just under the 11-hour mark when republican lieutenant governor david dewhurst ruled davis violated the senate's three-strike rule, a decision that was not well received by supporters outside the senate chamber. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. let her speak. >> according to dewhurst, strike one was wendy davis's mention of planned parenthood which republicans said was off topic. strike two came when a colleague offered davis a back brace seven hours into the filibuster, violating the lean policy. and the final strike came when davis mentioned the state's 2011
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sonogram law, again off topic. davis's filibuster fell short of the midnight vote deadline but her fellow democrats appealed the decision causing chaos in the chamber. >> at what point must a female senator raise her hand on her voice to be recognized over male colleagues in the room? >> for the next 15 minutes, supporters of davis drowned out any further senate debate. republicans tried to pass the bill before the midnight deadline but failed and in front of a packed capitol building of supporters, the announcement by the lieutenant governor that the bill was dead was read allowed. >> the lieutenant governor has agreed that sb-5 is dead. >> tina, we're seeing these fights more and more across america not in front of the supreme court but in state legislatures. >> i love this woman. i just love the fact that she decided like to get out there and just do this. it was so inspiring in a way just to see individual activism in full cry. i think we're going to see a
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great deal more of it. it has an inspiring quality that i think is going to make other women feel they must get out and do this. in our women in the world summit, some of the women from liberia said why aren't you doing what we're doing? liberia, they stormed the central legislature and forced charles taylor to kind of reconsider the whole issue of civil war. it's acts like that that can matter. i think people feel for too long their individual acts don't matter. this individual act mattered. >> mark halperin, expert on politics and all things texas, when does wendy davis run for governor? >> she's going to be a big figure not just in the state but in national politics. the question is, what can she and her side do in their round two of this fight which is coming. the lieutenant governor and governor perry i think bothing will support another special session to deal with this again. and democrats still don't have
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the votes. but what they do have is a lot of people power on twitter, on the internet, national focus on this issue. >> this erupted overnight. people just, the row tests, it went on twitter. even the president of the united states tweeted. and people stormed the capitol. >> this is about politics and dramaen an the real lives of people in texas. abortion rights supporters recognized if this law passed, it would be devastating to can assess to reproductive freedom throughout the state. they're going to fight really hard. it's still a very conservative legislature, a very conservative governoren lieutenant governor. davis and her side have a big challenge ahead of them now to win the next round. >> texas though is not a red state forever. >> demographics. >> it is becoming more and more purple. north dakota i believe it is that by law has some of the most restrictive abortion law practices and i think you may have one or two clinics in the
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entire state. texas is not north dakota. >> what you have on both the voting rights case and this abortion fight is people on left being full throated and outspoken. you don't see a lot of washington republicans celebrating the supreme court decision on voting rights act. you hear the wall street editorial page do it. >> you don't because there's so much emotion wrapped up in it. i was just reading numbers in the first hour, and i had people telling me not to be angry in reading numbers. >> but you've got to wonder what the texas republican legislators who have the vote in another special session, how they're going to react to the overwhelming outcry from women in texas and around the country telling them this law is not good for the state. >> this is not like, though, the virginia bill that we talked about a couple years ago where they were forcing women to have transvaginal procedures. we're talking about a banning of
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abortion after 20 weeks, which by the way, you take a poll of most americans, americans are becoming more and more pro-life. we see it year in and year out. that's not as shocking. republicans need to be careful not to overreach. democrats need to be careful though to do the same. >> to respond. >> there's other provisions. >> the thing about these abortion laws is they actually, they so hit poor women because rich women have always been able to get abortions always. they've always been able to go out of state and have an abortion whenever they want. that abortion doctor recently who was jailed creating these appalling abortions in that house, the only reason that woman was there and died was because she had been rejected for abortions. in the end, you cannot get an abortion if you have 0 keep on going to one of these clinics and getting rejected whereas rich women can go and get it done. >> i think you're right about the cutoff. but closing almost almost every abortion provider in texas is
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going to cause a huge outcry. people having to drive hundreds of miles to get what is a protected right. >> but mike, there are some laws that are causing people on the left to be enraged that will say, for instance, a doctor that performs abortions has to have hospital privileges nearby. >> there's no doubt about that, but both what's happening in texas and yesterday's supreme court decision, robert gibbs does it not get back 0 something you said a few moments ago? it's a double-edged sword in many of these states within the legislatures depending how they react. >> look, you know, we always talk about voter urnout. and how hard it is to get people to get excited about even voting in a normal election, but when you see the entire rotunda of the state capitol in austin packed with screaming people, you understand that when people and legislatures go out of the way to do something that people will find to be extreme as was
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said on the set like closing abortion clinics and access 0 reproductive health for virtually everybody in a state as big as thames, that gets people off their couches out of their chairs and marching for some either for change or to blocking what other people are trying to do in terms of radical change. i think it's one more step in representative democracy. >> it was an incredible drama overnight. tina and respondent thank you. still ahead, paula deen speaks out. the celebrity chef tries to repair her image but is it too late? we'll talking to steve stoute and donny deutsch straight ahead. and nik wallenda drops by the studio after his harrowing tight rope walk over the grand canyon. also, congressman keith ellison joins us on the supreme court's decision to strike down a key part of the voting rights act. that's next. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks.
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so i think what the court did today is stab the voting rights act of 1965 in its very heart. it is a major setback. these men that voted to strip the voting rights act of its
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power never had to pass a so-called literacy test. it took us almost 100 years to get where we are today. so will it take another 100 years to fix it, to change it? i call upon my colleagues in the congress to get it right. to fix it. >> witness now from capitol hill democratic representative from minnesota congressman keith ellison. we had pete williams on last segment. he was saying that the court warned congress four years ago. hey, this map's out of date. most people would suggest that the map's out of date. that reverend al was saying perhaps it needed to be expanded or some of the states feed to be changed around. is there any hope that congress can redo the map so it's more in line with the realities of 2013 than 1965? >> i think so. you know, the fact is is that
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back when we reauthorized the voting rights act in 2006, only 33 people voted no. everybody else in the house voted for it. and so i think there's a lot of people like congressman sensenbrenner, gong man goodlatte, congressman castle no longer in the house but who voted for it and many others who would probably i believe if their past is consistent with their present position be willing to sit down and say how do we make sure this map is right. i think it's also important to mention that section 4, which has been struck down, had an opt out provision and several jurisdictions were and have been opting out as early as may 2013. and so, you know, i think that the court was absolutely wrong, but it's not to say that there were not some jurisdictions that were engaging in voter discrimination that maybe needed to be covered but many of those who had set up a history of
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abandoning discrimination had been release. so it's not as if seconds four as not fluid. >> congressman, some people are looking at the president's reaction and saying a priped statement isn't sufficient. pretty strong reactions from the attorney general and others. but what kind of role would you like to see the president play now in explaining the decision to the country and trying to build consensus on capitol hill pore some kind of action? >> i tell you, i think the president really cares about voting rights. he made it clear in his state of the union speech how much he cared. he talked about the feed to protect the right to vote. and i this i he's been pretty consistent, but i would really welcome a statement from the president that is firmer and clearer and tries to pull all parties together to come up with a consensus around setting up a new formula. senator leahy is game. he wants to do something. he's made that clear. there's no doubt on dem side we're ready to get to work. i tell you this, i think as
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republicans look at immigration bill, as we look at this recent event with the voting rights act, this is a chance for them to really rebrand. this is a chance for them to say look, you know, we're an inclusive party. see us working on immigration and voting rights reform. we're all in, and trying to make a solution work for all people. we can debate you know, tax policy and spending policy. but area all here together to make sure all americans of whatever color can vote. >> congressman, do you think that the law was enforced over the last several years? >> i'm not talking about the long lines, the long waiting times. >> i hear. >> you for blacks to vote supposed to whites. i mean in 2012 and 2008, was the law enforced? >> well, there was some disturbing trends. it's clear statistically, blacks and hispanics sud? lines longer than whites did. it's hard to argue that there was some sort of accident.
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we do know we've gone through austerity and def vo lugs and have a smaller erl government than we tuesday used to have. perhaps that was a product of that. i will tell you there has been some fallout but also good things have had. so we've seen that voting rights get enforced in numerous places around the country when it got really egregious. that's what it was all about.we would prefer local communities to work these things out. it is right local communities should have the first cannes to work it out, but where you got real problems like in shelby county where they discontinued an election because they looked like they were going to have a black majority, i mean, really those egregious cases we really need the federal enforcement there. >> all right. congressman keith ellison, thank you very much. coming up next, a digital detox. >> i need one of those. >> for one full month? could you throw away your
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smartphone? could you do it? could you unplug your internet connection? that's what one writer did and he's here to tell us all about. fast company pagsz. come here, boy. ♪
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huffington post has the top ten -- one more text. software update. i've got to watch these movies. help. >> got to check my texts. e-mail. i've got watch all these movies before i have to return them. upload family photos. one more text. my dvr. facebook update. tumbler. >> fred, wait, please. >> you know what's happening? you're spiraling, you're out of control. there's too many things going on. >> i've got check my texts. >> help me, piece. >> yes, exactly. that was port landyia's version of a digital upload. bob safian and ceo of sulty
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straighted baratunde thurston. bear tuned day's friends once called him the most connected man in the digital world. >> was that you in the film? >> that was me. >> a lot of people mess up my name. you get extra points. >> how did i do with it hurtston? >> that was slippery. >> he cut the cord and removed himself from all e-mail and social yamidia including facebook, twitter. in the cover story he writes for 25 days, i would avoid all social media. i would not generate any activity whatsoever on any social ned work whatsoever. including but not limited to, seeing, reading, downloading, sending you be submitting, uploeting, updating or anythinging. i have to tell you, i don't know a lot of those different functions but i am definitely way too attached to the iphone
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and as a mother, it connections me to my kids. i knew things were bad when my husband took my daughter to a concert and said she's always on her phone and it was me texting her. i was like that's because of me. i was part of the problem. but what was it like? and why a month? >> well, it was a 25-day period. it was just because 2012 was so extreme for me. had i left my job, i had started a company, i put this book out and i was feeling burned out and overconnected, overresponsive. so one week didn't seem like it would be enough. it was also over the winter break. i could use it at the end of the year to try to take that pause. i felt i had been living broadly and thinly and not connecting deeply as one of my friends who i quoted in the piece said about the connections that i had in real life in physical space. >> baratunde is tweeting literally thousand of times a month and checking in on four square and manipulating a whole
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world of communication through the social media and you know, disconnecting from that was necessary and complicated. >> the election wasn't going to tweet itself. i had to do it. it was my job. >> how do you separate the job from the emotional connection to what you're doing? because it is addictive. i think this is a really serious topic for the next generation which is completely plugged in and constantly doing something on the iphone or the phone or the computer. >> yeah. it's not that these are bad things. i'm not an anti-technology person. >> i'm not either. >> but the level of control we exert over them and how much we feel that our whole self-worth is tied up into these things, like if you don't tweet it, it didn't happen that, sort of mentality, twit pic or it didn't happen, that's a little ridiculous. >> the other side the fear of missing out. so much information out therein an we're all constantly feeling we have to stay caught up and which of the different things we check into to know that's going on and getting the appropriate
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distance while also being connected tough to the information going on, that's the challenge we all have. >> what do you think about the theory held by a few people, me among them. >> held my mike barnicle. >> in like five years with regard to let's say twitter, area going to stop and say what was that all about? we were tweeting i just had a meat loaf sandwich or i changed my underwear. who care. >> the idea of tweeting a sandwich in your underwear i think is a little overblown. sometimes those amazing photos. like a sandwich and underwear in the same shot? that's creativity. do we still laugh at the idea of taking photos in general or polaroids? i don't know if twitter will be around in five years, but the idea of micropostings of our life probably isn't going away. >> it's great for a news feed. don't you think. >> you didn't answer e-mail for 25 an days. >> that's correct. >> what was your out of office message? >> it's in the piece.
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something like look, i've taken this thing called a vacation. i found out you can opt into that. if you have an emergency, call me on my cell. >> did you make phone calls. >> i was allowed to use the phone for voicen an testing one person at a time. like no blast texts. it was a loophole i designed. i'm not crazy. >> robert gibbs is with us from washington. he has a question. >> cool. >> gibbs? >> no, just i think it's amazing that you could even attempt to try to do this. you know, did people -- did your relatives feel disconnected? how did you stay in touch with those people that, you know, you knew you talked with pre day? >> so two things. one, i made a vip list of folks and let folks know ahead of time, i'll be gone. here's my number. actually got closer to my closest friends in new york. and in terms of the people who didn't see me, i didn't see them either. i didn't hear their screams like
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when you turn off social media, you turn it off. so you're not aware of the things you're missing, part of the beauty of it actually. >> if you were given a choice, facebook, twitter, texting, if you will could only have one, what would you take? >> probably twitter. >> really? >> yeah. it's my information. >> did it change you? >> it changed me in that i'm not permanently unplugged. but it reminded me of the power of presence and silence and emptiness. i take more breaks. >> how long after the segment ends will you check your e-mail and your twitter feed. >> i'm doing it right now with my brain. >> the brain doesn't stop. >> this is like i think the problem of the next generation honestly and impact on the brain and social life. >> and generation of no eye contact. >> oh, my god, exactly. for sure and being in the moment. >> excuse me. bumping into you. >> i hit a car. i walked into a car. all right. the cover story for fast company #uncluged bob safian and
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baratunde thurston. thank you very much. >> up next, the flying wallenda comes back to earth. nik wallenda joins us next. more "morning joe" in just a moment. [ panting ] we're headed the same way, right? yeah. ♪ [ panting ] uh... after you. ♪ [ sighs ] [ male announcer ] it's all in how you get there. the srx, from cadillac. awarded best interior design of any luxury brand.
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crazy god. praise jesus. help this cable to calm down. with the authority of god, praise you jesus. >> nik wallenda had no harness, no safety net and in just less than 23 minutes became the first person to walk across the grand canyon. here with us now, the daredevil himself, nik wallenda. >> what are you doing there? what's wrong with you. >> i know how he feels. >> seven generations and 200 years, this is what we do. this is life to me. >> i saw a documentary, i can't remember where.
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it must have been a great documentary just talk brg that, about your family, your life, the and iing. when was the first time you started training. >> i was 2 years old the first time i stepped on a wire. by the age of 4, i was walking on my own. first professional high wire performance was at 13. >> yeah. of course, there have been some tragedies. >> there have. lost several family members performing. >> so did any of that creep into your mind before you made this walk? >> you know, it is -- like i said, it's life to me. my great great grandfather said life is on the wire. everything is else is just waiting. of course, i think of the tragedies. we've learned a lot. my great grandfather was 73 walking between twoables in puerto rico. the cable was rigged improperly. he wasn't trained. he went down to the safety of the wire which is what i would have done if i had an issue
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crossing the canyon and i would have held on. he had a double hernia and injured collarbone and shouldn't have been on the wire. truth is, he should have retired sooner. because of that, i will retire sooner. >> what do you do mentally to prepare? >> a lot of prayer as the world saw the other day. >> by the way, that's exactly what everybody is saying. if i were on. >> i'll be good for the rest of my life. >> what was that? talk about how that an calmed you down when you were out on the wire. >> it's the way i was raised. the bible says god provides the peace that provides all understanding. i believe in that strongly. he's definitely listening. again, that's just where i find peace, how i stay calm and people are blown away by how calm i stay. >> look at that. just look at that. >> you say looking at the obviously the still picture right there, you say if anything went wrong, you would hang on the wire till your rescue teams came by.
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tell me about the rescue teams. where were they? how would that operate. >> and first of all, i wouldn't grab the wire with two hands and hang on. i would wrap myself around that wire and hold on. i've trained to hold on to a wire between 20 and 30 minutes. gravity pulls me down. while i was walking, i trained if my hometown of sarasota florida at the park with wind speeds of 92 piles per hour. wind gusts 45 too el to 55 miles per hour. the highest wind speed was a gust of 48 miles per hour while i was on the wire. at no point did it pick me up and lift me off. we had rescue teams as well as a helicopter standing by that would be with me in 60 secs. they have baskets hanging on the wire. the pen due hums have a quick release button. they would roll out to me, release the pendulums and it rollses over me and they would grab me. >> you say you took your first professional walk when you were 13? >> that's correct.
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>> was there any point when you were a teenager when you said to yourself, i'd rather be a shortstop? >> my parents if anything, my parents pushed me away from the industry and told me you need to stop doing this. doll something else. and i just couldn't. it was in my blood. it's something i love doing. >> i'm curious about the financials of this. who sponsors it, how much did you get paid and how do you factor that into what drives you to do it? >> you know, i do it for the love. i don't do it for the money. >> i get that. >> the passion is in what i do. niagara falls i barely broke even doing. i did pretty good here. it comes from sponsors. it comes from, of course, the network paying for it. we got incredible ratings. the discovery channel obviously is very thrilled with that. >> i hope you cut yourself a ratings based deal. >> absolutely. >> did you? good for you. new york there's been pushback. how do you go about doing the skyscraper. >> they said no. >> there's always pushback.
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and i this i if a camera got shoved in my face and i was the chief, i would have said the same thing. i understand that. we haven't even knocked on doors yet. niagara falls it took changing a law over 100 years old. it's a process. when we can ask permission, it's not as though we say i want to want across the city. here's the streets that have to close. here's how the people underneath are safe, how we guarantee no with you's going to hurt. there's a lot of process an goes into it. we're setting that up. we'll be doing that in the next couple months. i respect the law and respect all the officials and we'll do it properly, i guarantee you. >> nik, thank you for being here. you've got a couple boyce. >> two boyce and a girl. >> are they training? >> they're incredible on the wire. none of them want to carry it on. their college tuition is set aside. i'm like my parents saying go for it. i won't let them be on stage right now. i was on stage since a young
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child so the bug bit me young. >> thanks for coming in. nice to meet you. >> by the way, we go without a net every day. we've seven-second delay. >> drama off the court at wimbledon. serena williams and maria sharapova exchange words and it gets personal. [ male announcer ] erica had a rough day. good thing she's got the citi simplicity card. it doesn't charge late fees or a penalty rate, ever. because she's got other things to stress about.
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what's going on here? it's kind of crazy. holy cow. >> as wimbledon gets under way, two of its top stars are battling it out off the court. serena williams was reportedly venting about a certain tennis player, quote, if she wants to be with a guy with a black heart, go for it. the reporter surmised she was talking about maria sharapova. a rumored ex of serenas that set off this comment from sharapova. >> we've talked to serena many times.
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i know everyone tries to create rivalries. at the end of the day, we have a tremendous amount of respect for what we do on the court. if she wants to talk about something personal, maybe she should talk about her relationship and her boyfriend would was married and is getting a divorce and has kids. talk about other things. but not draw attention to other things. she has so much in her life, many positives. >> now that is a tactful way to do it. saying you know -- she can date my ex-boyfriend. she's still not going to be invited to the pool parties. >> sharapova was referring to serena's current coach and boyfriend. >> he's 43 years old and her coach is the rumored thing. this is all about the love triangle squared of the tennis court. >> she's still not going to get invited to the cool parties.
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>> i said, look, i want to personally apologize to you if you are offended by what -- by being bought into my situation, and i want to take that -- this moment to just pour myself and be open and say, i am very sorry for this whole situation. >> it's brutal. sharapova can't beat her. the subtext is it's pretty petty but -- >> wait a minute, i smell a rat -- >> listen, serena's a star on another level. sharapova's pretty nice person to deal with from a media perspective. i have no idea what's behind the
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curtain with either one of them. >> they're going to play the second rail match today and tomorrow. >> guys, this is not -- this is made up. >> no, it's not. it is far too personal. >> i'm sorry, i don't believe it. you are too cynical. >> you guys are falling for it. sorry. >> the smackdown in the texas legislature. they pass a strict new anti-abortion bill despite a 13-hour filibuster. reverend al sharpton is going to come by and talk about the supreme court's decision to strike down key portions of the voting rights act. plus, a new poll out, anthony weiner, ahead. is like hammering.
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if we were truly talking about women's health care, if we were truly talking about making sure women were safe after an abortion, this is the kind of thing that goes right to the heart of that and that we can agree -- >> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe."
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back with us on set, reverend al sharpton, mark halperin and thomas roberts. >> what happened in texas last night? >> it's a fascinating story. we'll begin overnight in texas with the drama that has many americans hearing the name wendy davis for the first time. that's because davis, a democratic state senator there, filibustered the sb-5 anti-abortion bill for over 11 hours. going late into the night and drawing attention across the country as thousands were watching live online. >> if we were truly talking about women's health care, if we were truly talking about making sure women were safe after an abortion, this is the kind of thing that goes right to the heart of that. and that we could agree -- >> the bill would have banned abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy and forced it is closure of most abortion clinics in the state. according to texas filibuster rules, davis had to stay on
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topic, could not lean on anything, and could not take a bathroom break. and she would continue to speak till just under the 11 hour mark when republican lieutenant governor david due hurst ruled davis violated the senate's three strike rule. a decision that was not well received by supporters outside the senate chamber. according to duhurst, strike one was davis' mention of planned parenthood which republicans said was off topic. strike two came when a colleague offered davis a back brace, violating the lean policy. can you believe this? and the final strike came when davis mentioned the state's 2011 sonogram law. again, off topic.
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really? davis' filibuster fell short of the midnight vote deadline but her fellow democrats appealed the decision causing chaos in the chamber. >> at what point must a female senator raise her hand or her voice to be recognized over the male colleagues in the room? >> for the next 15 minutes, supporters of davis drowned out any further debate. republicans tried to pass the bill before midnight. the midnight deadline. but failed. and in front a packed capitol building of supporters the announcement that the bill was dead was read aloud. the bill would have banned abortions after 28 weeks of pregnancy and forced the closure of most abortion clinics in the state. >> so mark halperin, this is where the abortion debate goes now. i mean, the supreme court is giving states more latitude to make these sort of decisions. we're talking about -- here we're talking about 20 weeks. i think we're going to be seeing this a lot more in the coming years. >> not just the 20 weeks but
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there's other restrictions here that some say would deny access to abortion -- abortion rights access to a lot of women in texas. this is round one. mikka laid out a lot of drama from last night. rick perry i think is likely to call another special session and bring this up again. as much as the eyes were on texas, they're really going to be on it if there's a second round. >> while we're on politics, anthony weiner's candidacy for mayor of new york city was looked upon with skepticism by many. remember that, a lot of disgust? >> just like viewers skeptical about barack obama in 2007. >> i was not skeptical. >> who was that? >> i was not skeptical about obama or anthony weiner believe it or not. >> really? >> i told you all his wife would help him out a great deal because she's an amazing woman. after trailing by a wide gap in the polls for weeks, a new one shows him in the lead. an nbc 4 new york/"wall street journal" poll shows the former
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congressman taking a lead over front-runner christine quinn. 49% of voters said they'd consider voting for him. weiner leads among men and even women. for those would said they would consider voting for him is up by 9 points. those who said they wouldn't vote for him dropped. >> politics, a strange thing. new york city politics, even stronger. >> very strange. stranger things have happened. >> can he win? >> he can win. whether he will win, i have no idea. he's come out here and spoke. he was well received. but i still thing it's anyone's race to call. it's not going to be decided until very late. >> lucky enough to be with christine quinn last night at an event in the city. she seemed very upbeat and agreed to come on today. >> good job. >> look at him, he works around the clock.
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>> he doesn't sleep. >> i'm not watching documentaries. >> invite this man to a dinner party, assume he'll try to book you. >> i've been known to do that. >> speaking of quinn, so why is quinn, mark halperin, she seems to be facing resistance. why? >> i think she's not found her voice. i think she's lost control of her public image. she's been a weak front-runner all along. i still think she can win. i think right now she's going to have to change the dynamic, of the race to make the runoff. >> is he helpful, hurtful to these candidates? >> i think the only candidate who has a better chance than anthony weiner is bill thompson and mayor bloomberg has turned his guns on bill thompson because bill thompson got the endorsement of the teacher's union. remarkably outspoken against bill thompson. >> which may help him because you're talking about a democratic primary. democratic primary, i would want bloomberg against me.
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because of the third term is still something that he changed the law and a lot of democrats, including me, did not agree with that. stop and frisk and other things. in a general, bloomberg may be hel helpful. in a democratic primary -- >> absolutely right. >> runoff, hypothetical runoff, christine quinn leads anthony weiner by about 2%. and 14% that remains undecided. so you got to imagine they are setting their sights on those undecideds. >> i guess the shock here is anthony weiner has so quickly come back. >> we'll follow that. it should be very interesting. >> you know what, headline writers at the "new york post" celebrating -- >> at some point -- >> am i reading what they say about be an thouanthony weiner banana? no. >> because. >> what? >> i'll tell you what.
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>> what? >> okay, first of all, there are men in politics who have done far worse -- >> okay, here we go. >> far worse, far, far, far, far worse -- >> okay, i get your point. today, the nation's highest court -- >> -- and embarrassing, leave him alone. -- and rulings on the last three cases -- >> follow him on twitter. >> no, i've seen unbelievable stories. marb yesterday, the supreme court struck down a key part of the most important civil rights law ever passed in america. the voting rights act of 1965. reverend al? >> i'm confused. i really -- i'm genuinely confused here. the law stays in place. they take out the part though that targets these states that extraordinarily offensive discriminatory practice back in 19 -- poll taxes and literacy
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tests and would do anything to keep minorities from voting and they succeeded. why, roberts asks, all these years later, do we keep -- section 4-b that targets these states who actually now have more african-americans going out percentagewise than white voters? >> well, first of all, the fact that you have more going out does not go with his ruling. more going out because they're protected to go out. you don't remove the remedy and then say the patient ought to heal himself or herself. what they've done in this ruling, which is devastating to voting rights in my opinion, is they've said, oh, voting rights is fine, section 5 is fine, the preclearance by the justice department, but we're going to take the mapw away. what is equivalent to is saying
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yes, the medicine is helping the patient but is not healing the patient totally so let's take the medicine away that is in place until we can find the medicine that's going to heal him totally. which means you end up with no medicine. >> no, it means you treat all 50 it's stas the same -- >> why are you going to take the medicine out out in? why would you remove the map till you get a better map? what you're saying is these states -- that last year, not 65, last year, a federal court in texas said that the voter i.d. laws that texas were changing was discriminatory. last year, you had texas, florida, south carolina, that -- the remedies -- last year. we're not talking about 65. so why would you now have it open with texas yesterday, came in with voter i.d., so they can discriminate now -- >> section 2 still allows the court to tib continue to apply
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the '65 voting rights act is still intact. the court yesterday said, we're not going to presume that arizona is more racist than new york -- >> -- you can't have free clearance, which means you can go in, justice department, and sue or try to spend a lot of money and get an injunction. but you no longer have to have clearance. none of these states have to come to you to change things. which handicaps our voting rights. >> you think in arizona, in alabama, in georgia, if they want to move a voting polling place from a middle school in a neighborhood to an elementary school in a neighborhood, that the federal government has a right in 2013, in 2013, to presume that they're bigots and they have to clear it first with the justice department? >> no, i presume that in 2013, based on 2012, the last
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election, that in texas and south carolina and others, that they may come up with schemes that would disproportionately impact the voting of minorities because the federal court in texas said it last year. so we don't have to argue about it. this is a fact. >> i'm not arguing. i'm talking about numbers here. and the numbers are overwhelming. african-american participation has exploded across america. >> because we were protected. >> including -- yes -- >> now that protection is gone. >> al, will you please just let me say a sentence or two here? >> all right. >> all i'm doing is i'm giving you facts and numbers, okay. i think -- and if you look -- i heard it all last year about voter suppression. it was a higher turnout for african-americans than ever before in the history of the united states. and you -- let's look at mississippi for instance. again, i'm just talking about numbers here. in mississippi, back in 1965,
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6.7% of the african-american population voted in 1965. in 2004, 76.1% of the african -- from 6% to 76%. last year over 80% of african-americans in mississippi voted. more than white voters percentagewise in mississippi. and i guess you and i see this differently. i believe voting rights act needs to stay in place forever. but this one section that says these states are racist and have to be looked at and that history ended in 1965, to me, and perhaps it's because i've lived in the southeast and i've lived in the northeast and i've heard people talking behind closed doors in the southeast, and the northeast, and in a lot of ways,
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the southeast has been through the fire and we actually have a more open view on race than a lot of places i've lived in in the northeast. perhaps i don't think we should treat these states and arizona based on how they were in 1965. any more than we should judge germany based on 1945. >> let me respond. one, i agree with you there are more than those states. but you do not therefore say that we're going to let those states go, not have to preclear, even though there is recent history. last year, joe, not '65, 2012, that courts found discrimination. we're going to let that go. they can change whatever they want. yesterday, texas went and instituted voter i.d. yesterday, right after this decision came. which a court last year said was discriminatory. i'm saying why didn't you take
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that in place. >> you're talking about somebody bringing a picture i.d. when they go vote? >> i'm talking about picture i.d. i'm talking about ending sunday before primary day. that a federal court found discriminatory. not al sharpton. not the civil rights group. >> are we really comparing making somebody bring a photo i.d. to a voting booth and ending early voting in some areas, is that akin to a poll tax or to the blatant outrageous discriminatory practices -- >> no, it's -- >> you and i can have a debate on voter i.d. i don't think it's race et. there are studies that shows it affects white voters as well as black voters. >> you can't put a new paint job on an old car and act like we have a new car. >> i'm not even going to follow you into that analogy because i'm not exactly sure what it
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means but i will say this. changing the rules on the margins on early voting and making somebody bring a picture i.d. to the voting booth, far different from literacy tests, poll taxes, taking a baseball bat to the side of people's heads. i mean, the world has changed. i've got to say that while supporting the civil rights act, this would be section, section 4-b, i actually look at it as a positive thing that these states have changed s ed so much over past 50 years, that we have moved beyond the racism of 1965. >> i think the problem for the court's decision is that it really does, now, require congress to fine-tune how the civil rights act is going to work in the current world. congress is in no position because of the polarization to do it. >> still ahead, natalie cole
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will join us with the review of her new album and discuss important cause of millions of baby boomers. also next, paula deen speaks out in her first interview since the scandal broke but did she say enough to repair her reputation? we're going to talk to image experts next. we'll also take a trip down memory lane for other memorable celebrity apologies. >> it is hot and humid already right now. we've got temps well into the 70s in most areas and we've got rain to talk about. off and on showers and some isolated stronger thunderstorms. especially the eastern half of the country. you can see we've already had early this morning some severe thunderstorm watches back across parts of illinois and into indiana. we have some heavy rain. also into ohio. biggest threat today for some of our stronger storms will be across the eastern half of the
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country. areas where we could end up seeing in yellow possible wind damage, some large hail, tornadoes would be isolated at best. this looks like more of a strong thunderstorm-type breakout. temperatures are hot. we are well into the 90s. we should hit 90 in new york city again today. making it an official heat wave. we are going to see some of that rain come down in seattle. one of the cooler spots right now. highs today in the lower 70s. "i'm part of an american success story," "that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers,"
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♪ sorry seems to be the hardest word ♪ >> i am here to say i am so sorry. i was wrong. i've worked hard and i've made mistakes, but that is no excuse. ♪ i'm sorry >> sounds horrible, and i'm ashamed of that, that came out of my mouth, and i'm not that, that's not who i am. >> i lost my temper on stage. said some pretty nasty things. you know, i'm really busted up over this. i'm very, very sorry. >> i am deeply sorry for my irresponsible and selfish behavior i engaged in. >> i have no memory of that event. i'm not an anti-semite and i'm not a racist. i know i'm not. >> it's just completely unacceptable and we are so sorry and embarrassed and we know better. >> i'm sorry.
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it's a popular phrase for celebrities seeking to repair their public image. now it's paula deen's turn. this morning, the celebrity chef went on the "today" show to try to repair her reputation after a deposition admitted she revealed racial slurs. >> perhaps view others as not equal -- >> no, no, you know, i -- no, what you see is what you get. i'm not an actress. i'm heart broken. i'm thankful for my partners. >> heart broken why? heart broken for yourself or your family? >> heart broke n -- i've had to hold friends in my arms while they've sobbed. because they know what's been said about me. if there's anyone out there that has never said something that
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they wish they could take back, if you're out there, please pick up that stone and throw it so hard at my head that it kills me. please. i want to meet you. >> wow. >> joining us now, chairman of deutsch incorporated danny deutsch, so good to see you, and steve stoute, ceo of the marketing firm translation and the author of the book "the tanning of america." >> paula deen actually going on the offense while on the defense using the biblical analogy, let he who is without sin cast the first stone. doesn't sound much like an apology to me. >> i think it's a little too little too late. she should have went the first time they invited her to the "today" show. youtube was sort of taking the back route. >> yeah, if you're -- donny, if -- if a buyer comes -- would
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you ever go to a client and say, you know what, i think paula deen would be a great place for you to advertise, whether it's now, six months from now? anthony weiner's in first place in the new york mayoral race. americans have a short attention span. but is this the end? >> disclaimer, i've interviewed her many times, i like paula. there's a bigger discussion. it's interesting. i'm watching the mel gibson setup piece. as a jew, i'm going, this guy, i'm never going to a movie again, and as a white person, i obviously think what she did was horribly wrong. but obviously hits me in a different way. what she did say in the end is actually true. is that probably everybody somewhere has said something a inappropria inappropriate. we would kid with each other. words are dangerous. and words -- does somebody's
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life deserve to end over it? >> this is -- so here's a question. as a guy, we've all said a word here, we've all made a joke there. but this is an ongoing thing with her, the deposition claims. >> that's a different story. the last point she said is an interesting point. in answer to your question, joe, unfortunately, advertisers -- or fortunately, can't go with her anymore. it is what it is. >> for how long? >> two years from now, somebody says, i want to sponsor her. they'll start getting petitions from thousands of people and the ceo will go, i don't need this headache, and that's the problem. >> i agree with that 100%. when you watch her on the "today" show, my daughter does it, she wants something, she has the face where she looks like she's crying but nothing comes out of her eyes. it did not feel sincere. >> why can't peep juople just sm
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sorry? mark sanford, very complicated situation. he screwed up big time. you know what, he went around crying and he said, i screwed up big time. these people who apologize without apologizing -- >> that's a different apology, that was an infidelity -- >> she's bringing up bible here. >> that's an infidelity that i think people accept a lot more than racism -- >> you see a southern woman -- >> astute observation -- >> you cannot get anything past this guy! that's why we have him on the show. >> that's why i get the big bucks. when you see a southern white woman, you don't know her and you're just watching and she is saying at some point in my life i've used that horrible word. as a black guy, do you go, she's automatically a racist or like a professor said, in "time" magazine, said, it's not right, i understand people from a different generation can use that word and not necessarily be racist. i'm just asking -- i'm not defending it.
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bold word. >> i understand. the first thing you have to understand is the intent of the person. i wasn't there when she said it to determine if she was a racist. should she be saying that word? no, it's a very sensitive term. shouldn't be saying that. she tried to say in the interview that she has other people saying it. and she complains they should not be doing it. yet she said it herself and condoned it. i don't think -- she doesn't have to be a racist because she said it but it's still out of line. and it's out there publicly, right, somebody sued her for it. so she's a defendant in a deposition. and she's apologizing after she's lotising the money. >> that's not even an apology. people who cry, feel sorry for the people, by the way, jesus said let he without sin cast the first stone. again, i agree with the sentiment that none of us are perfect and we've all screwed up but, please, that ain't an apology. call that something else. >> her problem i would submit is the culture and the times that
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we are a part of, in that every explanation is automatically turned into an excuse online. and everything lives forever. she could prostate herself on fifth avenue, where sack cloth for 100 years and google is going to flashlight to the top. that's not only her problem, it's the problem of a lot of people. >> how about the geography of being from the south? that has a lot to do with it as well. we can't even -- we can't sideskirt the fact that she's from the south. the south has been deeply rid within discrimination. and she comes, you know, from the south and she says this word. of course she's going to be criticized for such. >> she said in the interview she used the offensive word just once during a robbery. take a look. >> the day i used that word, it was a world ago. it was 30 years ago. i had had a gun put to my head.
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a shaking gun. because the man that had the gun to my head, unbe knowing to me, was my customer at the main office, and i had gone -- >> -- used the word on other occasions -- >> no, no, no. >> other than that one time in the bank, a robbery attempt, you're telling me you have never used the "n" word? >> i never. i never. they asked me in all of my 66 years on earth had i ever used it. >> she lost me on that. in the deposition, she said of course, meaning, oh, i've used it -- you wouldn't say of course if you used it 30 years ago -- >> how would you use it if a guy has a shaking gae ining gun to ? >> that's a good point. >> strategy -- >> talk him down, say, please, sir, here's the money. >> not the time for a racial slur. no. so we know that didn't fly at all. and to say she only used it one time in 30 years. >> come on.
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>> that i wasn't buying. mike brings up the bigger issue. it's going to be interesting in the next generation who are electing public officials and whatnot how much of a pass people get for either pictures of them smoking bongs, using bad words, because everything now lives forever. it's going to be -- 20 years from now, when i turn 60 and joe turns 90, if we were sitting around this table, would the discussion be different? >> not on race. see, this is the one area. where we talk about infidelity. we talk about mark sanford. we talk about anthony weiner. everything's forgivable. bill clinton proved everything was forgivable at the highest level. american's attitudes have changed. but not on race. >> not at all. it's going to stay -- race and religion always going to stay sensitive topics. what just happened with the voting acts law yesterday. it's very sensitive right now. >> i think younger people -- it has changed. when you talk about our
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president, they don't see hip -- >> i wrote a book on that. the tanning of america. >> it's by my bedside. >> thank you for your support. >> -- anything by your bedside, go ahead. >> young eer people definitely understand each other in shared values than discriminating on race. it doesn't change the fact that using the "n" word or deep sensitivity around religion. jewish people don't want to feel that -- any language that's disparaging towards jews, they're not going to accept that. >> here's the other rub. if you and i as friends and you used a jewish slur against each other -- >> we wouldn't be in the court of law either. >> see, i think there's -- watching that and watching you watch, giving what you do for a living -- >> both you guys in real time -- >> i think we need to be honest about that. >> -- both of their reactions just immediate.
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you didn't buy it. >> is there any advice you could have given her that would change the outcome? i don't think so. it's more to do with paula deen -- >> i think she did everything she could. i think at this point, you just have to lay low and let time and whatever's going to happen is going to happen. >> the corporations, if she's trying to protect her deals, that's done. she can't do that. that's over with. she needs -- >> even if they wanted to, they can't, because they have -- >> what about testimonials from people who work for her? >> let's say 100 people say she's amazing. i'm the ceo of the food network. i say i'm standing by her. the next day, i'm getting petition, of thousands of people would say i used to watch your network, i no longer watch your network. >> how does she -- >> let's go to the next step then. she decides to go one line and create her own. glenn beck's done it.
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paula deen's online network. make money that way? i know a lot of people -- >> i'm sure there's a lot of people who watched that interview and said, i feel sorry for her, i support her. i believe she didn't use the word in a discriminatory -- >> she's got a lot of good will by her fans. >> yes, she's going to do that. there's probably an opportunity. she's not going to get corporate backing. there's not a ceo in america would can stand behind that and say we're going to put public money behind that. >> she can still find a lot of ways to make money. she's got a big following. i feel badly about the whole thing. >> wow. steve stoute thank you very much. >> thanks, i'm happy to be here. >> donny, stay with us if you can. >> great to see you. >> how long you been dealing with doni? >> i've known donny about four years. looks the same. hair perfectly in place. >> in my business which is a lot of dummies one of the smartest
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guys around. >> thank you, donny. >> notice i qualified that though. >> coming up, grammy award-winningaward-win award-winning artist natalie cole. her first release since she had a kidney transplant. [ jennifer garner ] why can't powerful sunscreen feel great? actually it can. neutrogena® ultra sheer. its superior uva uvb protection helps prevent early skin aging and skin cancer, all with the cleanest feel. it's the best for your skin. neutrogena® ultra sheer. [ agent smith ] i've found software that intrigues me. it appears it's an agent of good. ♪ [ agent smith ] ge software connects patients to nurses to the right machines
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♪ unforgettable ♪ though near or far ♪ like a song of love ♪ that clings to me ♪ how the thought of you does things to me ♪ >> that is of course the unforgettable recording of "unforgettable" that natalie cole did with her late father. another dsong with her dad in hr debut spanish album. tackle the title. >> "natalie cole es ponel." >> it is not that hard to say. >> here's the deal, okay. i can't speak the language. >> i don't speak it fluently either. >> nor can you. this is like walking on a tight
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rope. >> because it's easier to sing it actually. >> is it really? fascinating. this is also of course your first album since a momentum event in your life. >> it was here in new york city i went into kidney failure. and i was having trouble breathing and my girlfriend who i shout out to, denise rich, who is one of my dear friends. she heard me on the phone. she called her doctor. would ca who came to see me. they don't even do that any more. he said, you got to go, you know, back with me. he took x-rays. he said, your kidney's function at 8%. i'm going to put you in the hospital right now. and i was at lenox hill for ten
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days. i ended up going on dialysis. had wonderful doctors. >> obviously. >> you know, eventually went back to los angeles, my home. and i was on dialysis for probably seven, eight months. and, you know, looking for a kidney, which is why i'm part of the -- an organization now that does research on, you know, kidney disease. but the chances of getting a kidney, especially if you live in a big city or, you know, great state, so small. so difficult. >> you meet a nurse in the hospital -- >> i was there, i ended up being there for a day. she was my nurse for the day. we just got along really great. and several weeks later i did "larry king." and he asked me, if i can get a
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kidney right today, would i do it. i said no, because i'm really doing okay and someone needs it more than i do. and that nurse was watching with her niece jessica. and they -- the lady said, i wish i could help that lady because she was so nice. and like several weeks later maybe, jessica passed away. would was an organ donor. she was eight months pregnant. the baby made it though. his name is lucas. and the family agreed when esther went to them to give me her kidney. it was a perfect match. they're from el salvador. that's why i said i have a little latino in me. >> she's got a little bit of latin in her. you to another duet with your dad. >> with my dad. we just keep rolling them out. >> can i just say this, he
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doesn't age. it's very interesting. you know, we grew up -- my dad just worshiped your father. we grew up and we listened to your dad. christmas for us -- my dad, the day after thanksgiving, would wake up, and we would hear nate king cole. >> that's when it starts officially. >> you know what though, which made me so happy about you. we tease you coming. and he said, you know, talked about you, said, nat king cole's daughter. mika said, why's that even in there? she's become such an artist in her own right. >> but that's how it started. i was just called nat king cole's daughter. >> when did it become natalie cole? when did you start noticing that? >> probably not till i made a record. up till then, i was still nat king cole's daughter. the question was, can she really
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sing? >> yes, she can. >> it was really to prove -- i had a lot of proving to do up till then. i think between that first record and the night i won my first grammy was kind of a -- okay. >> you get a grammy, they stop qualifying. >> circle of life though. i mean, it's really amazing. nat king cole dies at the age of 47. lung cancer. 1965, around there. in a year when medical research into cancer was minimum compared to now. years later, kidney transplants and you're singing with your dad, duets. >> it's been quite an experience, quite a journey. and i wouldn't have -- i could. say i wouldn't have traded it for anything, you know, because there's challenges and, you know, but i'm better than i ought to be. i really am. i've seen a lot things since then. i am really one of the lucky
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ones, one of the blessed ones really. >> all right, natalie. thank you so much for being with us. i'm going to sing along. >> you could probably learn how to speak spanish if you listen to that record. >> that's what i'm going to do. because i need to do it. thank you so much for being with us. coming up next, interest rates for college loans are going to double for next week. will congress do anything about it? next with cnbc's kelly evans. i'm jennifer hudson. i hate getting up in the morning. i love cheese. i love bread. i'm human! and the weight watchers 360 program lets me be. the reason i'm still in this body feelin' so good isn't because i never go out and enjoy the extra large, extra cheese world we live in. it's because i do. and you can too, with the weight watchers 360 program.
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wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. let's go to cnbc's kelly evans. some good news out there. i hear consumer confidence is going up. that's always good. >> i hate to bring in the news from this morning then because we've gotten a couple of weak data points. in the first, i want to mention, what happened to gdp in the first quarter. usually by this point the revisions aren't large but we just learned the economy grew at only 1.8% annualized. that's down from what we thought was about a 2.4% growth pace.
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there were downward revises in business spending and consumer spending. a little conundrum as to why consumer sentiment has been strong. it does make sense given that's when the sequester hit. it doesn't leave the economy with very much momentum heading into the next of the year. that leads me into the second point. what's about to happen to student loan rates. next week, because congress has been focusing on trying to get i gra immigration passed, they're likely to have to leave before they can keep rates from doubling. they're going to double. i will just leave you with this. all of this happening on the one hand. on the other hand, neiman marcus filing to go public. and the owner of lord & taylor may be bidding for saks fifth avenue. luxury, luxury is back. >> luxury is back, department store wars, very exciting. i heard a lot of guys tell me a lot of women talking about how the student loan bubble may be
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the next huge bubble to burst. any concern about that? on the street? >> huge concern. and here's what's really interesting. to this point, we haven't yet seen this become kind of a systemic issue, systemic concern. it's been more about what happens to this generation saddled with the highest debt loans and among the lowest job prospects. the question then becomes, if you look at the data, joe, what's interesting, default rates on student loan debt much higher than other types credit. and they can't be discharged in bankruptcy. either the taxpayer forks the bill or if we forgive the student debt loans or we don't foregive student debt loans. hugely contentious issue. this is just a little glips imp m into it. >> it is going to be a huge issue. it's just like back over the past ten years, you talk about people not being able to own their own house.
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you get hammered by republicans and democrats alike. it creates a huge bubble. it's the same thing with student loans. >> the number of people who have not repaid their student loans is astronomical. >> is growing. >> politicians can't talk about it. >> no jobs. >> it's a growing problem. more in just a minute. i want to make things more secure. [ whirring ] [ dog barks ] i want to treat more dogs. ♪ our business needs more cases. [ male announcer ] where do you want to take your business?
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i need help selling art. [ male announcer ] from broadband to web hosting to mobile apps, small business solutions from at&t have the security you need to get you there. call us. we can show you how at&t solutions can help you do what you do... even better. ♪ if you have high cholesterol, here's some information that may be worth looking into. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. getting to goal is important, especially if you have high cholesterol plus any of these risk factors because you could be at increased risk for plaque buildup in your arteries over time. and that's why when diet and exercise alone aren't enough to lower cholesterol i prescribe crestor. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor right away
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welcome back.
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it's time to talk about what we learned today. >> the filibuster, bring it to twist twitter, a good story. >> fascinating. >> i love filibuster and twitter in the same sentence. bringing the words of politics and technology together. >> madeleine, mark's niece, happy birthday. happy birthday. >> happy birthday. >> i need to unplug for a month. >> you do need to unplug for a month. donny, it's great to have you back. love you. your dad a great man. >> very sorry. >> what do you say about your dad? >> the best human being i've ever met in my life. left all of our tanks full. >> it's what too early. it's "morning joe." "the daily run down is coming up." if there was a pill
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to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin dedicated to your eyes, from bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite is uniquely formulated to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. and now there's ocuvite eye + multi. an eye vitamin and multivitamin in one. good thing she's got the citi simplicity card. it doesn't charge late fees or a penalty rate, ever. because she's got other things to stress about. ♪ go to citi.com/simplicity to apply.
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supreme decisions. in just about an hour from now, the highest court in the land will decide the future of same sex marriage in america. just one day after striking down a key part of one of the most important civil rights laws ever passed in this country, we're live at the supreme court. plus, turmoil in texas. a marathon filibuster watched by hundreds of thousands of people across the country as democrat state senator wendy davis takes

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MSNBC June 26, 2013 3:00am-6:00am PDT

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

TOPIC FREQUENCY Texas 40, Us 21, Davis 17, Anthony Weiner 17, America 16, Mississippi 9, Paula Deen 8, New York City 8, Christine Quinn 8, Mark Halperin 7, Natalie Cole 6, Pete Williams 6, United States 6, At&t 6, Joe 6, Serena 6, Wendy Davis 6, Angie 6, Robert Gibbs 6, Alabama 6
Network MSNBC
Duration 03:00:59
Scanned in San Francisco, CA, USA
Source Comcast Cable
Tuner Channel v787
Video Codec mpeg2video
Audio Cocec ac3
Pixel width 1920
Pixel height 1080


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on 6/26/2013
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